Salary Survey 2013: Restructure

As marketing department restructures continue we assess the impact shake-ups have on your salary.

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The survey shows how the restructuring of marketing departments continues, although much of the root and branch reorganisation implemented when the economic downturn hit in 2008 has been completed. Marketers expecting reorganisation in their teams this year is down from 53 per cent in 2012 to 49 per cent. However, last year 61 per cent experienced a shake-up.

Of those marketers expecting more changes, one-quarter anticipate staff cuts, 24 per cent a reduction in marketing spend and 21 per cent a merger with other departments.

During 2012, there were major reorganisations. These included the overhauling of Ocado’s marketing team during a wider company restructure, Direct Line Group bringing

together product development and marketing and Royal Bank of Scotland implementing a new group marketing structure across its retail banking brands.

GlaxoSmithKline insight manager Loretta Quinn says restructuring is a regular part of life at large brand owners. “It can be disruptive but you get used to it as a marketer because you adapt your personal working style,” she says. “You must be proactive and able to manage yourself effectively, although too much restructuring can affect the morale of the team.”

Viewpoint

The effect of a restructure

claire parlour

Claire Parlour
Ex-channel development & insight director at Brakes; now freelance marketing & innovation consultant

My current position is a result of a marketing department restructure and after more than 25 years of industry experience for brand owners such as Northern Foods, Premier Foods and Mars, I am pragmatic about it.

Change is the only constant in a marketing team. Consumers are constantly evolving so our departments must too, but perhaps the speed of change is accelerating.

Salaries may be flat or falling but I was surprised that almost three-quarters of people did have some kind of pay rise last year. What we are seeing is individuals differentiating themselves through performance-related bonuses that keep them committed and motivated.

People with specialist skills are certainly in demand, which is why I am looking forward to freelancing. I have a broad marketing background but my last role was focused on insight, and brands need marketers who can turn data into real business actions.

We will see more flexible working as technology enables marketers to work remotely. Employers know their staff can be contacted virtually any time these days, so the quid pro quo is that marketers can work more flexibly when they need to, as long as they deliver the output expected.

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